yosemite eyewear

Eyewear A-Z

Smarty guide to everything from eye exams to progressive to eye conditions. 

Eyewear A-Z

All you need to know about vision and eyewear

Acetate – is a king of plastic! Did you know that acetate is famous for its hypoallergenic properties? This means that it’s very unlikely to cause an allergic reaction or irritation to your skin, making it a perfect material for eyeglasses. Plus it’s super strong and durable material. 

Anti-reflective coating (also called “AR coating”) improves vision, reduces eye strain and makes your eyeglasses look more attractive.

These benefits are due to the ability of AR coating to virtually eliminate reflections from the front and back surfaces of your eyeglass lenses.

Astigmatism is a type of refractive error caused by the irregularities in the shape of a cornea. In this condition, the eye fails to focus the light equally on the retina leading to blurred or distorted vision. It can be present at the time of birth, or can develop gradually in life.

Astigmatism is a common eye condition.  Astigmatism is a refractive error and is not an eye disease or eye health issue. Astigmatism is simply a problem with how the eye focuses light.

“Axis” is the number on your prescription that determines the direction of your astigmatism correction. The cylinder and the axis always go together—you can’t have one without the other!

Bifocals are eyeglasses with two distinct optical powers. These commonly prescribed to people with presbyopia who also require a correction for myopia, hyperopia, and/or astigmatism.

Blink reflex is an involuntary blinking of the eyelids elicited by stimulation of the cornea (such as by touching or by a foreign body), though could result from any peripheral stimulus. A fun fact – a normal person blinks 20 times a day and the duration of blinking is around 0.3 seconds.

Blue block or blue light lenses are designed to reduce various levels of HEV blue light. They can help alleviate issues like glare and eye strain.

Color blindness is not a form of blindness at all, but a deficiency in the way you see color.

If you are colorblind, you have difficulty distinguishing certain colors, such as blue and yellow or red and green.

Don’t want to wear glasses? Contact lenses are a great alternative. And with so many varieties to choose from, nearly everyone can wear them. Daily disposable lenses make wearing contacts a breeze — wear them once and throw them away.

Other options include gas permeable contact lenses, lenses for overnight wear, and special-effect contact lenses. Read on to learn more about contact lenses and how to choose the best contacts for your lifestyle and visual needs.

This piece of information appears on your prescription. It refers to the lens power needed to correct for an astigmatism. The cylinder and axis always go together—you can’t have one without the other!

It’s an important part of your regular eye exam because it allows your doctor to get a better look inside your eyes. After dilating drops cause your pupils to grow in size (dilate), your doctor can more clearly see various parts of your eyes, including the optic nerves, retinas and blood vessels. 

This better view can help doctors more quickly and easily diagnose a host of diseases, both eye-related and not, including: glaucoma, cataracts, high blood pressure, etc.

The downside of getting your eyes dilated is that it makes your vision blurry and your eyes extra-sensitive to light for a few hours, or sometimes a bit longer.

 

As you age, so do your eyes.  WE recommend to update your prescription every 1-2 years, depending on your age and medical history.  

Eye drops = liquids that you apply to your eyeballs for various purposes. It takes some practice to apply eye drops, because putting fluid directly onto your eyeballs does not exactly feel natural. You can get different kinds of drops for different purposes: itchy eyes, dry eyes, etc. Some drops are medicated to treat glaucoma, eye infections, and other conditions. It’s best to ask your  doctor what drops are right for you.

Tired eyes are a common result of extended eye strain, like staring at a screen all day or driving long distances. 

Tired eyes will not cause permanent eye damage, but it’s still important to recognize the symptoms of tired eyes so you can make changes to retain and improve eye comfort.

Red, itchy, watery eyes that are bothered by the same irritants that cause sneezing and a runny nose among seasonal allergy sufferers — are very common.

In addition to having symptoms of sneezing, congestion and a runny nose, most of these allergy sufferers also experience itchy eyes, watery eyes, red eyes and swollen eyelids.

If you are farsighted, you have trouble seeing near objects, but you can see distant objects clearly.  The medical term for this is hyperopia.

A flexible spending account (FSA to save breath) is a savings program that allows you to set aside pre-tax money for specific health care expenses—prescription eyeglasses, prescription sunglasses, eye exams. Your FSA may expire at the end of the year, so best check those balances and get a little something come December.

Glaucoma is a group of eye conditions that damage the optic nerve, the health of which is vital for good vision. This damage is often caused by an abnormally high pressure in your eye. Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of blindness for people over the age of 60. It’s very important to have your eyes check every year. 

It’s almost like FSA’s  health spending accounts (or HSA for short) allow you to set aside pre-tax money to use on approved health care expenses like, say, prescription glasses or prescription sunglasses, contacts.

High-index lens” is a fancy phrase for a type of thin plastic lens that comes in handy for some higher prescriptions. There are two types of high-index lens (1.67 & 1.74)

You’ve just had an eye exam and your doctor has given you an eyeglass prescription. He or she probably mentioned that you are nearsighted or farsighted, or perhaps you have astigmatism.

The first step to understanding your eyeglass prescription is knowing what “OD” and OS” mean. They are abbreviations for oculus dexter and oculus sinister, which are Latin terms for “right eye” and “left eye.”

Your eyeglass prescription also may have a column labeled “OU.” This is the abbreviation for the Latin term oculus uterque, which means “both eyes.”

Cylinder (CYL). This indicates the amount of lens power for astigmatism. If nothing appears in this column, you have little or no astigmatism that requires correction.

Axis. Axis” is the number on your prescription that determines the direction of your astigmatism correction. 

Add. This is the added magnifying power applied to the bottom part of multifocal lenses to correct presbyopia. The number appearing in this section of the prescription is always a “plus” power, even if it is not preceded by a plus sign. 

A great way to help cover the cost of prescription glasses, prescription sunglasses, contacts, and.

Learn more here!

High-index lens” is a fancy phrase for a type of thin plastic lens that comes in handy for some higher prescriptions. There are two types of high-index lens (1.67 & 1.74)

Light-responsive lenses begin to darken when exposed to UV rays (in both direct and indirect light)—then fade back to clear indoors. The technology is built into the lenses, so the treatment won’t rub or peel off.

Monovision means wearing one contact lens that corrects only distance vision in one eye, and wearing another lens that corrects only near vision in the other eye. This has traditionally been a popular way to correct presbyopia for contact lens wearers.

 It’s a common vision condition in which you can see objects near to you clearly, but objects farther away are blurry.

Twin pads that rest on the sides of your nose and ensure a snug fit.

This abbreviation appears on your prescription. It stands for “oculus dexter,” which is “right eye” in Latin. Everything sounds cooler in Latin.

An optician is an eye care professional who is trained to interpret, fit, and dispense prescription eyewear. They don’t provide you with the prescription itself, but they make sure everything is up and running perfectly after you’ve gotten a prescription from an eye doctor.

An optometrist is the doctor who gives you a prescription for glasses and/or contacts. They can also diagnose eye diseases and prescribe some medications.

Schedule your visit with one of our optometrist.

An ophthalmologist is a medical doctor who specializes in the treatment and diagnosis of eye diseases, as well as in eye surgery. This person can also prescribe medications, glasses, and contacts.

This abbreviation appears on your prescription. It stands for “oculus sinister,” which is “left eye” in Latin. 

A phoropter is an instrument used to test individual lenses on each eye during an exam. If, during an eye examination, your doctor has discovered a vision problem like nearsightedness, farsightedness or astigmatism, it’s likely that one of the next steps you’ll take will involve a phoropter.

“Plano” refers to a lens without a prescription.

Polarized lenses eliminate glare, making it easier for you to see without straining your eyes. How do they work? When you are wearing polarized sunglasses, the surface blocks the glare by filtering out the horizontal light waves that don’t fit through the chemical laminate pattern. Images may appear darker while wearing polarized lenses. 

Polycarbonate lenses are ultra-durable, ultra-lightweight lenses. They are more than 10-times more impact resistant than your average plastic or glass lens.

This is a piece of information that may appear on your RX. If your doctor includes a prism correction on your prescription, you’ll see a little triangle symbol next to it, like this: ∆

Progressive lenses are like a fun “two-for-one” deal, offering multiple focal corrections all in the same lens (distance correction on top, intermediate in the middle, and reading correction on bottom). This means you can see your whole field of vision without switching between multiple pairs of glasses. 

PD is the distance between your pupils! It’s a handy measurement that helps align your lenses to fit the frames you choose. 

The average pupillary distance for an adult is about 63 mm, but this is not a number you’ll want to guesstimate. 

Readers (or reading glasses) are glasses with non-prescription lenses that make it easier to read. They’re available in various preset magnification strengths, which users can choose from to match their needs. Keep in mind that if you have a different power in both eyes you would need to ask your optician to make you a pair ( you won’t find them over the counter).

Progressive lenses are like a fun “two-for-one” deal, offering multiple focal corrections all in the same lens (distance correction on top, intermediate in the middle, and reading correction on bottom). This means you can see your whole field of vision without switching between multiple pairs of glasses. 

SAVE UP TO $300

WITH AN ANNUAL CONTACT LENS SUPPLY.

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